Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Cypriniformes > Cyprinidae > Notropis > Notropis hudsonius
 

Notropis hudsonius (Sucking carp; Spottail shiner; Spot-tail minnow; Spottail minnow; Spottail; Spawneater; Shiner)

Synonyms:
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Wikipedia Abstract

The spottail shiner or spottail minnow (Notropis hudsonius) is a small- to medium-sized freshwater minnow. It can be found as far north as the Canada and as far south as the Chattahoochee River in Georgia. These shiners live in lakes, rivers, and creeks. They occupy the rocky or sandy shorelines and bottoms of the water. One of the defining features of a spottail shiner is the black spot found at the base of the caudal fin. These shiners generally spawn from late June through July.
View Wikipedia Record: Notropis hudsonius

Attributes

Adult Length [1]  6 inches (15 cm)
Brood Dispersal [1]  In the open
Brood Egg Substrate [1]  Lithophils (gravel-sand)
Brood Guarder [1]  No
Litter Size [1]  3,709
Maximum Longevity [1]  5 years
Diet [2]  Carnivore, Planktivore
Female Maturity [1]  1 year 6 months

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
Apalachicola United States Nearctic Temperate Floodplain River and Wetlands    
Middle Missouri United States Nearctic Temperate Floodplain River and Wetlands    
Teays - Old Ohio United States Nearctic Temperate Upland Rivers    
Upper Missouri Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Upland Rivers    

Protected Areas

Predators

Esox lucius (Jack)[3]
Hiodon alosoides (Yellow herring)[4]
Perca flavescens (Yellow perch)[4]
Sander vitreus (Walleye)[4]
Sterna forsteri (Forster's Tern)[5]

Consumers

Range Map

Distribution

America, North - Inland waters; Canada; Great Lakes; Mackenzie; Mississippi; Missouri; Nearctic; Nelson-Saskatchewan; North America: St. Lawrence River in Quebec, Canada to Altamaha and upper Chattahoochee River in Georgia, USA; Hudson Bay, Great Lakes, and Mississippi River basins from Ontario, Canada to Mackenzie River drainage in Canada and south to northern Ohio, so; North America: St. Lawrence River in Quebec, Canada to Altamaha and upper Chattahoochee River in Georgia, USA; Hudson Bay, Great Lakes, and Mississippi River basins from Ontario, Canada to Mackenzie River drainage in Canada and south to northern Ohio, southern Illinois and northeastern Montana, USA.; St. Lawrence; USA (contiguous states);

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
2Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
3A quantitative comparison between diet and body fatty acid composition in wild northern pike (Esox lucius L.), Karl Schwalme, Fish Physiology and Biochemistry vol. 10 no. 2 pp 91-98 (1992)
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5Feeding Ecology and Nesting Success of Forster's Terns on Lake Osakis, Minnesota, Gail Fraser, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, 1994
6Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License