Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Scorpaeniformes > Sebastidae > Sebastes > Sebastes alutus
 

Sebastes alutus (Snapper; Salmon canary; Rockfish; Rock cod; Pop; Pacific ocean perch; Ocean perch; Menuke rockfish; Longjaw rockfish; Black bass)

Synonyms: Sebastichthys alutus; Sebastodes alutus
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Wikipedia Abstract

The Pacific ocean perch (Sebastes alutus), also known as the Pacific rockfish, Rose fish, Red bream or Red perch has a wide distribution in the North Pacific from southern California around the Pacific rim to northern Honshū, Japan, including the Bering Sea. The species appears to be most abundant in northern British Columbia, the Gulf of Alaska, and the Aleutian Islands (Allen and Smith 1988).
View Wikipedia Record: Sebastes alutus

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  1.698 lbs (770 g)
Female Maturity [2]  8 years 8 months
Male Maturity [1]  10 years 6 months
Maximum Longevity [2]  100 years

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Aleutian Islands Biosphere Reserve 2720489 Alaska, United States    
Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve II 366714 British Columbia, Canada
Mount Arrowsmith Biosphere Reserve 293047 British Columbia, Canada  
Pacific Rim National Park Reserve II 137900 British Columbia, Canada

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Distribution

Alaska (USA); California Current; Canada; East Bering Sea; Gulf of Alaska; Japan; Kuroshio Current; North Pacific: Honshu, Japan to Cape Navarin in the Bering Sea (but not in the Sea of Okhotsk) and La Jolla, California, and along the Aleutians from Stalemate Bank and Bowers Bank to the Alaska Peninsula. Stocks have suffered severe population decline ; North Pacific: Honshu, Japan to Cape Navarin in the Bering Sea (but not in the Sea of Okhotsk) and La Jolla, California, and along the Aleutians from Stalemate Bank and Bowers Bank to the Alaska Peninsula. Stocks have suffered severe population decline due to over overfishing (Ref. 27437).; Pacific Ocean; Pacific, Eastern Central; Pacific, Northeast; Pacific, Northwest; Russian Federation; Sea of Japan; USA (contiguous states); West Bering Sea;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
3Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
4Szoboszlai AI, Thayer JA, Wood SA, Sydeman WJ, Koehn LE (2015) Forage species in predator diets: synthesis of data from the California Current. Ecological Informatics 29(1): 45-56. Szoboszlai AI, Thayer JA, Wood SA, Sydeman WJ, Koehn LE (2015) Data from: Forage species in predator diets: synthesis of data from the California Current. Dryad Digital Repository.
5FOOD HABITS AND DIETARY OVERLAP OF SOME SHELF ROCKFISHES (GENUS SEBASTES) FROM THE NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN, RiCHARD D. BRODEUR AND WILLIAM G. PEARCY, FISHERY BULLETIN: VOL. 82. NO.2. 1984. p. 269-293
6Endemic sturgeons of the Amur River: kaluga, Huso dauricus, and Amur sturgeon, Acipenser schrenckii, Mikhail L. Krykhtin & Victor G. Svirskii, Environmental Biology of Fishes 48: 231–239, 1997
7Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
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