Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Charadriiformes > Alcidae > Brachyramphus > Brachyramphus perdix
 

Brachyramphus perdix (Long-billed Murrelet)

Wikipedia Abstract

The long-billed murrelet (Brachyramphus perdix) is a small seabird from the North Pacific. It is an unusual member of the auk family, often nesting far inland in old growth forests. The long-billed murrelet, like its cousins the marbled and Kittlitz's murrelets, is thought to have experienced a decline in numbers recently.It closely resembles the marbled murrelet, of which it was considered a subspecies until 1998, when Friesen et al.
View Wikipedia Record: Brachyramphus perdix

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
13
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
44
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 10.8653
EDGE Score: 3.16676

Attributes

Male Weight [1]  296 grams

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Aleutian Islands Biosphere Reserve 2720489 Alaska, United States    

Prey / Diet

Ammodytes americanus (inshore sand lance)[2]
Ammodytes hexapterus (Stout sand lance)[2]
Ammodytes marinus (sand eel)[2]
Boreogadus saida (Polar cod)[2]
Clupea harengus (Yawling)[2]
Clupea pallasii (Pacific herring)[2]
Eleginus gracilis (Wachna cod)[2]
Gadus chalcogrammus (Whiting)[2]
Gadus macrocephalus (Pacific cod)[2]
Gadus morhua (rock cod)[2]
Macruronus magellanicus (Patagonian whiphake)[2]
Macruronus novaezelandiae (Whiptail hake)[2]
Mallotus villosus (Capelin)[2]
Micromesistius australis (Southern poutassou)[2]
Micromesistius poutassou (Poutassou)[2]
Pleurogrammus azonus (Okhotsk atka mackerel)[2]
Pleurogrammus monopterygius (Atka mackerel)[2]
Pollachius virens (Sillock)[2]
Pseudophycis bachus (Southern rockcod)[2]
Reinhardtius hippoglossoides (Turbot)[2]
Sardina pilchardus (European pilchard)[2]
Sardinops sagax (Australian pilchard)[2]
Sprattus sprattus (Whitebait)[2]

Distribution

North America;

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by 1Nelson, SK 1997. Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus).. In A. Poole, F. Gill. [eds.]. The birds of North America, No. 276. The Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, and the American Ornithologists' Union, Washington, DC 2Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
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Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access