Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Sphenisciformes > Spheniscidae > Pygoscelis > Pygoscelis adeliae
 

Pygoscelis adeliae (Adelie Penguin)

Wikipedia Abstract

The Adélie Penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) is a species of penguin common along the entire Antarctic coast. They are among the most southerly distributed of all seabirds, as are the Emperor Penguin, the South Polar Skua, the Wilson's Storm Petrel, the Snow Petrel, and the Antarctic Petrel. In 1840, French explorer Jules Dumont d'Urville named them for his wife, Adèle.
View Wikipedia Record: Pygoscelis adeliae

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
29
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
55
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 22.0368
EDGE Score: 3.83024

Attributes

Adult Weight [2]  10.69 lbs (4.85 kg)
Birth Weight [3]  124 grams
Clutch Size [3]  2
Diet [1]  Carnivore
Incubation [4]  34 days
Migration [1]  Intracontinental
Water Biome [1]  Coastal

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Map Climate Land
Use
Scotia Sea Islands tundra United Kingdom Antarctic Tundra    
Southern Indian Ocean Islands tundra South Africa, France, Australia Antarctic Tundra    

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Map Climate Land Use
Macquarie Island Nature Reserve Ia 233540 Tasmania, Australia  
Palmer LTER Site Long Term Ecological Research   Antarctica    

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Aethotaxis mitopteryx (Threadfin pithead)[5]
Cyllopus lucasii[6]
Dissostichus eleginoides (Patagonsky klykach)[7]
Dissostichus mawsoni (Antarctic blenny)[7]
Euphausia crystallorophias (ice krill)[8]
Euphausia superba (Antarctic krill)[7]
Hyperia macrocephala[6]
Kondakovia longimana (Giant Warty Squid)[9]
Notothenia coriiceps (Black rockcod)[5]
Pagetopsis maculatus (Crocodile icefish)[5]
Pleuragramma antarctica (Antarctic silverfish)[8]
Trematomus bernacchii (Emerald notothen)[5]
Trematomus eulepidotus (Blunt scalyhead)[5]
Trematomus newnesi (Dusky notothen)[6]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Competing SpeciesCommon Prey Count
Aphrodroma brevirostris (Kerguelen Petrel)1
Aptenodytes forsteri (Emperor Penguin)9
Aptenodytes patagonicus (King Penguin)1
Arctocephalus gazella (Antarctic Fur Seal)3
Arctocephalus tropicalis (Subantarctic Fur Seal)1
Balaenoptera acutorostrata (Minke Whale)3
Daption capense (Cape Petrel)2
Diomedea epomophora (Royal Albatross)1
Diomedea exulans (Wandering Albatross)1
Dissostichus eleginoides (Patagonsky klykach)2
Electrona carlsbergi (Electron subantarctic)1
Eudyptes chrysolophus (Macaroni Penguin)2
Fulmarus glacialoides (Southern Fulmar)2
Gymnoscopelus braueri (Lanternfish)1
Gymnoscopelus nicholsi (Nichol's lanternfish)1
Halobaena caerulea (Blue Petrel)2
Hydrurga leptonyx (Leopard seal)1
Hyperoodon planifrons (Southern Bottlenose Whale)1
Lagenorhynchus cruciger (Hourglass Dolphin)1
Larus dominicanus (Kelp Gull)1
Lepidonotothen squamifrons (Grey rockcod)1
Leptonychotes weddellii (Weddell Seal)3
Leucocarbo atriceps bransfieldensis (Antarctic shag)2
Lobodon carcinophaga (Crabeater Seal)4
Macronectes giganteus (Southern Giant Petrel)2
Megaptera novaeangliae (Humpback Whale)4
Mirounga leonina (Southern Elephant Seal)2
Oceanites oceanicus (Wilson's Storm-Petrel)1
Ommatophoca rossii (Ross Seal)1
Orcinus orca (Killer Whale)1
Pachyptila desolata (Antarctic Prion)1
Pachyptila salvini (Salvin's Prion)1
Pachyptila turtur (Fairy Prion)2
Pagodroma nivea (Snow Petrel)3
Phoebetria fusca (Sooty Albatross)1
Phoebetria palpebrata (Light-mantled Albatross)2
Physeter macrocephalus (Sperm Whale)1
Procellaria aequinoctialis (White-chinned Petrel)1
Pygoscelis antarcticus (Chinstrap Penguin)1
Pygoscelis papua (Gentoo Penguin)3
Stercorarius maccormicki (South Polar Skua)2
Sterna vittata (Antarctic Tern)1
Thalassarche chrysostoma (Grey-headed Albatross)2
Thalassarche melanophris (Black-browed Albatross)3
Thalassoica antarctica (Antarctic Petrel)3

Predators

Hydrurga leptonyx (Leopard seal)[7]
Orcinus orca (Killer Whale)[7]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Austrogoniodes antarcticus[10]
Corynosoma hamanni[11]
Corynosoma pseudohamanni <Unverified Name>[11]
Parorchites zederi[11]
Tetrabothrius pauliani[11]
Tetrabothrius wrighti <Unverified Name>[11]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Faunia (Parque Biologico De Madrid,SA)

Range Map

Link to Map

Audio

Play / PauseVolume
Provided by Xeno-canto under a Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 2.5 License Author: Sofia Wasylyk

Photos

Citations

Species recognized by Peterson A.P., 2011-09-22, in Catalog of Life 2011
Attributes / relations provided by 1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org 2Ainley DG & Emison WB 1972. Sexual size dimorphism in Adélie penguins. Ibis 114: 267–271. 3Terje Lislevand, Jordi Figuerola, and Tamás Székely. 2007. Avian body sizes in relation to fecundity, mating system, display behavior, and resource sharing. Ecology 88:1605 4A balanced model of the food web of the Ross Sea, Antarctica, M.H. Pinkerton, S.M. Hanchet, J. Bradford-Grieve, CCAMLR Science, Vol. 17 (2010) 5The role of notothenioid fish in the food web of the Ross Sea shelf waters: a review, M. La Mesa, J. T. Eastman, M. Vacchi, Polar Biol (2004) 27: 321–338 6DIET OF ADE&#769;LIE PENGUINS PYGOSCELIS ADELIAE AT SHIRLEY ISLAND, EAST ANTARCTICA, JANUARY 1992, SHARON KENT, JULIAN SEDDON, GRAHAM ROBERTSON & BARBARA C. WIENECKE, Marine Ornithology 26, pp. 7-10 (1998) 7Who's Eating Who 8Diet and foraging effort of Adélie penguins in relation to pack-ice conditions in the southern Ross Sea, David G. Ainley, Peter R. Wilson, Kerry J. Barton, Grant Ballard, Nadav Nur, Brian Karl, Polar Biol (1998) 20: 311-319 9Towards the trophic structure of the Bouvet Island marine ecosystem, U. Jacob, T. Brey, I. Fetzer, S. Kaehler, K. Mintenbeck, K. Dunton, K. Beyer, U. Struck , E.A. Pakhomov and W.E. Arntz, Polar Biology, 29 (2). pp. 106-113 (2006) 10Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19 11Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 gis.wwfus.org/wildfinder
Images provided by Google Image Search
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
EDGE analysis provided by EDGE of Existence programme, Zoological Society of London
Range map provided by Ridgely, R. S., T. F. Allnutt, T. Brooks, D. K. McNicol, D. W. Mehlman, B. E. Young, and J. R. Zook. 2007. Digital Distribution Maps of the Birds of the Western Hemisphere, version 3.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia, USA.
Data provided by NatureServe in collaboration with Robert Ridgely, James Zook, The Nature Conservancy - Migratory Bird Program, Conservation International - CABS, World Wildlife Fund - US, and Environment Canada - WILDSPACE.
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access
Institution information provided by International Species Information System - May 2011
Audio software provided by SoundManager 2